Close
Industry News

Fume-Extracting Iron: A Cosmoprof Debut

Anne Moratto | July 22, 2012 | 1:22 AM

Beauty companies plan their product launches to coincide with the four day Cosmoprof North America Trade Show because it's a great place to see and be seen.  Today, Modern had the opportunity to preview the new Fume Iron launching as a collaboration between Izunami and Conceptual Designer, Nick Johnson.   This new system was the brainchild of Johnson, who, along with his wife/hairdresser, Marzia, owns Marzia Salon in San Franciso.  There, they have had a thriving Brazilian Keratin business, with Marzia predicting at the outset of the smoothing movement that it would be “the next big thing.”   When concern about the fumes emitted during the service became apparent, Johnson set out to find a solution. The result is the Fume Iron, a tool that “vacuums” or extracts the fumes or chemicals at their source—right at the plate—so they’re never released into the air.  And once captured, the fumes travel down a tube into a lightweight air purifier. 

“Like anything elegant it is not as simple as it seems,” says Johnson. “This merges two complicated industries—beauty and industrial fume extraction—into one system. You have to get the right balance of so many variables—there needs to be a certain volume and rate of extraction to work and to keep it quiet.” 

But it is quiet.  And light.

“The one issue we discovered is that hairdressers might worry the iron isn’t hot enough because you don’t see any fumes so you’re worried it’s not heating up and working,” said Johnson. "All that escapes might be the tiniest wisp."

The cost of the Fume-Iron (SX-L model) is $1299 to the salon.  Find out more at www.izunami.com

Facebook Comments

More from Industry News

Hair Color Trends
Hair Color Trends

How To Winterize a Summer Blonde: Babylights with Reverse Balayage using Redken pH Bonder

Alison Alhamed and Jamie Newman | November 29, 2016

Our summer blonde made the perfect model to demonstrate the beauty of Redken’s new pH Bonder because although she isn’t frequently coloring her hair, living in New York City means she’s walking outside a lot with exposure to the sun and city elements—plus thermal damage from regular use of a curling wand or flatiron. So with protection and hair health being the two key benefits of the additive, she was all in.  

Load More