Education is an investment that can pay-off directly. Your two-step plan:

1. Talk it Up. At Samuel Cole Salon in Raleigh, North Carolina, basic training mirrors European apprenticeships, while regular in-salon training and continuing education boost stylists’ expertise. The salon posts high-hype, press-release style stories on its website any time stylists take outside education, like several did recently at Bumble and Bumble University, and the Wella Studio in NYC. The online releases stress new techniques learned and how they’ll be introduced in the salon.

2. Make it Count. Set minimal education requirements for stylists at various levels. Once they’ve been met (along with your other criteria), raise the stylists’ service charge by $5. Anytime employees become certified specialists of any sort, repeat the one-two punch.

Shaun Settle, co-owner of Avant Gard Hair Salon in Avon, Indiana, says price increases are based on 16 factors, one of which is in-house and outside education.

“We present the increase to guests as a promotion, and they’re so excited for their stylist, they don’t mind a bit,” says Settle.
Remember, service prices should be based on the cost of the service, plus your desired profit. Every expense should be calculated in the costs, including training.

Education Investment
Higher education allows custom formulas and higher prices at Avant Gard Hair Studio. Here, the top formula was created by mixing Mastay 5.34 with 7.34 to achieve a 6.34, which was added to 6.1 neutral ash to achieve the perfect shade. The deeper undertone is a 4.34 chocolate.

Hair by Josef and Shaun Settle. Photo by Scott Crosby.