Actress Amanda Bynes attends the TAO and LAVO anniversary weekend held at TAO in the Venetian Resort Hotel Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Jamie McCarthy/WireImage)

Ombre hair, where color transitions from dark on top to light at the bottom, is reversing itself as the temperatures warm up, says Marc Harris, owner of Marc Harris Salons in Boston. More women will begin switching up their hair color to an ombre style that’s light on top fading to dark at the bottom. This look is softer and more transitional. It provides a tonal harmony as opposed to the past ombre trend where the transition of color was stronger and there was a bolder color contrast.

According to Harris, reverse ombre hair complements the soft hues predicted for summer 2013 fashion and for those who like to experiment with beauty, he expects we’ll see this trend in unique palettes like pink/dusty rose, purple/pearl, blue/slate and orange/melon. For everyday hair, this looks best on women who use a natural palette for their hair’s color transition [such as: espresso to deep amber (brunettes), butter to vanilla (blondes) and auburn to copper tones (redheads)].

Here are Harris’ Do’s and Don’ts when it comes to reverse ombre:

The Dos and Don’ts of Reverse Ombre HairDo

Use soft transitional toning.

For Blondes use a palette for such as butter/vanilla.

For natural brunettes use a natural palette such as deep amber/espresso.

For redheads use a natural palette of sunburn/copper.

Use unique trend palettes such as pink/dusty rose, purple/pearl, blue/slate orange/melon if you like to experiment with color.

Pick a shade that’s 3 to 4 shades darker than the natural hair.

Begin with the tips/ends of hair and leave the color on there the longest.

 

Don’t

Use stark contrasting palettes.

Use colors that work in contrast to the natural skin tone.

Don’t think eye popping; think natural.

Ignore the condition and quality of the client’s hair.

 

 

For more information about Marc Harris Salons, visit salonmarcharris.com.