Study Results: "What Clients Want from Hair Stylists"

By Lauren Salapatek | 01/09/2012 2:16:00 PM

 

Pivot Point International, Inc., headquartered in Evanston, Illinois, has released an in-depth study engaging more than 500 consumers to determine what they look for in a hair designer. The study also helps establish communication patterns between consumers and designers.

Among the highlights of the survey, are these important findings:


More than half of consumers interviewed visit a salon six or more times a year.


Men are more likely than women to visit their hair designer 10 or more times per year (34 percent vs. 19 percent).


Hair shaping and styling are the most popular services purchased by both men and women.


More than 40 percent of women receive hair color services vs. 16 percent of men interviewed.

Salon owners need to pay attention to the following aspects of their businesses, as the following are most important in their decision to choose a salon:


Cleanliness of salon
Ease of getting appointment when needed
Hair designer is on time for appointment
Cost of services in line with expectations
Location is convenient for target clients
Hours of operation match the client’s own schedule

Consumers are very loyal to their hair designer. And women from 36 to 60+ are the most loyal. Among men, those 26-35 year of age are most loyal to a single stylist. More than half of loyal clients have been seeing the same stylist for three years or more.
 
Hair Designers are Trusted Advisors:
 
When asked to think about their trust in their hair designer, in relation to other service providers, hair designers were on par with a client’s therapist and auto mechanic. Pivot Point interprets this high trust factor as indicating the importance of continually improving both technical skills in hair design and the softer skills of stylist-client communication through ongoing, lifelong education.

Training:

 
When made aware of a designer receiving regular training, consumers’ opinion of their designer changes. Respect for styling suggestions, referrals to others, respect for product suggestions and even a willingness to pay more for services all increase when a stylist informs clients he/she is getting regular training. Increased training has more of an impact on those who do not consistently see the same stylist than those who are loyal to a particular stylist. Consistent training of all designers, therefore, will help a salon retain all types of clients. Clients believe that attending classes, fashion and beauty events, along with online and television research are the ways stylists learn what’s new.
 
The Client and Hair Designer Relationship:
 
In what’s important to clients about their hair designer, friendliness, technical skills and professionalism rank highest among those interviewed, over candor, humor and product knowledge.
 
In conversations with their designer, women choose to discuss what style or cut they receive as most important, indicating that the pre-design consultation is essential to building a strong relationship with female clients. Women also want to discuss what salon products to buy, what hair color is best for them, and, of course, the latest in celebrity gossip and current events!Above all, consumers value their stylist’s recommendations on hair care: some 60 percent say they always or almost always rely on their designer’s expertise. This reliance increases dramatically with the number of years a client has been coming to a particular designer.
 
Simply explaining what they want in hair design remains the most often communication tool between stylist and client, making People Skills the most important tool for communication. Fewer bring in photos from a magazine, a book or the Internet. Here again, technology plays only a small role as only 6% show photos to stylists on a smartphone with 1% offering photos on an iPad or electronic tablet.

 

 

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Lauren Salapatek

Lauren Salapatek Lauren Salapatek, Web Editor for Modern Salon | Salon Today | First Chair.

(Previous positions: Associate Editor/E-Newsletter Content Production Manager)

Since January 2010, Lauren has worked for Modern Salon Media covering salon style, product and beauty trends, and business editorial for both print and online content. As of October 2013, Lauren’s role changed to Web Editor—now she manages all online editorial content for modernsalon.com, salontoday.com and firstchair.com. As part of her responsibilities, she creates, edits, organizes and curates content for all Modern Salon Media’s websites; manages the creation and production of all Salon e-newsletters; promotes Modern Salon Media’s digital content via several social media accounts (Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest); and maintains an editorial calendar to keep all Modern Salon Media’s websites timely and current.

You can find Lauren on Google+ or e-mail her at lsalapatek@modernsalon.com.

 


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paris Cimino    
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maryland  |  January, 09, 2012 at 03:42 PM

What were the questions that were ask. I would love to know how you worded these questions.

john tarsi    
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Tampa  |  January, 18, 2012 at 07:51 AM

A clean salon is so important. Sit in different chairs around the salon and get a clients few of the work space from all angles. I agree, communication is paramount. New guests I ask "What do you like best about your hair?" allow a response. Next question, "What don't you like about your hair?" allow a response and build from there. If a guest is returning for the 100th time I ask "When your hair was fresh, what did you like best about it?" allow a response then follow up with "What didn't you like about it?" allow response ,if any. This will help insure that the guest and stylist vision are in the same direction.

john tarsi    
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Tampa  |  January, 18, 2012 at 07:51 AM

A clean salon is so important. Sit in different chairs around the salon and get a clients few of the work space from all angles. I agree, communication is paramount. New guests I ask "What do you like best about your hair?" allow a response. Next question, "What don't you like about your hair?" allow a response and build from there. If a guest is returning for the 100th time I ask "When your hair was fresh, what did you like best about it?" allow a response then follow up with "What didn't you like about it?" allow response ,if any. This will help insure that the guest and stylist vision are in the same direction.

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