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Facebook or Instagram: Which is Better for the Solo Artist?

September 14, 2018 | 3:39 PM
Photography: Getty Images

When you’re working as a solo artist, social media can be a communications and marketing savior. It’s a quick and easy way to reach out to existing and prospective clients. But where should you devote your social media energy—Facebook or Instagram? The answer is—both! Each platform offers important benefits for the solo artist so it’s vital to give each its share of attention.

Why Facebook

Facebook is the best way to keep in touch with the clients you already have. Because it’s more text-heavy than Instagram, you can share critical business information like your hours, address, service menu and details about upcoming events. Facebook is the place to let people know about a last-minute opening in your schedule or to conduct a contest or service or retail promotion. Create a Facebook business page and use keywords that are heavily searched—like balayage and pixie cut—in the “About” section. Facebook is also a great place to build your Facebook followers. Salon Patine in Santa Barbara, CA, recently conducted a promotion challenging followers to share a photo the salon posted on their Facebook page. When the follower gathered 20 likes for the share, they received 20 percent off a product purchase. Facebook is also a prime medium for driving traffic to your Instagram account.

Why Instagram

Instagram is primarily visual, which makes it the ideal platform for hair artists This is the place to attract new clients with your work while engaging existing clients as well. Here is where you post finished looks and, ideally, before and afters. Think of your Instagram page as the portfolio for your brand and use it to showcase the type of work you wish to focus on. For example, stylist and social media pro Constance Robbins (@constancerobbins) lists her specialties as balayage, dimensional hair color, reds and lived-in vivids. Accordingly, her page is largely made up of photos of these types of work. Hashtag your posts with highly searched keywords, including your local area (#grandrapidshair, #tucsonbalayage), and tag clients who are likely to repost your work. Finally, make sure to include your location in your Instagram bio. You don’t want your hard work to be wasted when fans want to make an appointment and can’t find you.

 

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