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Hair Color Trends

What Is SunBun? — The New Hair Coloring Technique That Incorporates Top Knots and ’90s Tie-Dye

Elizabeth Jakaitis | June 15, 2016 | 10:51 AM
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SunBun How-To

"The end result varies every time, which is what makes this technique so unique. No two looks will ever be the same, so it is ideal for clients looking for originality in their style." —Harriet Muldoon

Harriet Muldoon (@harrietmuldoon), head colorist and technical educator at Blue Tit Salons and Academy in London, created the latest coloring technique, ideal for summer 2016: SunBun. The technique, inspired by the '90s, was developed in response to the growing trend for multiple colors and allows a variety of spontaneous hues to be created with a stunning marbled, tie-dye effect.

Performed on locks that have been pre-lightened, bleached or have a high-lift tint, the look is accomplished by sectioning hair into segments, then creating small top-knots across the head. The more top knots, the more color. The SunBun technique is most dramatic when contrasting tones are placed next to one another, resulting in a bold, 3D effect of bold color.

"While it’s much more effective to see the variation in tones and different shades next to one other, so they can really pop, a softer look can also be created for a more natural effect," Muldoon says.

Blue Tit's go-to method for pre-lightening hair before SunBun-ing is the Davines Flamboyage service, which uses see-through meche strips for a new approach to applying color. 

Scroll through for Harriet Muldoon's SunBun how-to. 

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