Art Meets Nature

By Alicia Liotta | 04/03/2008 2:25:25 PM

 

Art Nouveau:
An international style of art, architecture and design that peaked in popularity at the beginning of the 20th century (1880-1914). It is characterized by highly stylized, flowing, curvilinear designs.

Modernism:
A trend of thought that affirms the power of human beings to create, improve and reshape their environment, with the aid of scientific knowledge, technology and practical experimentation. Modernism encouraged the re-examination of every aspect of existence. (wikipedia.com)

 

“Geoganic,” the latest collection from International Creative Director Mark Hayes and the Sassoon team, merges curvaceous shapes with graphic lines. “This collection combines Art Nouveau and Modernism to create a new aesthetic—organic modernism,” says Hayes.

Although inspired by art movements of the past, this new collection reflects a more self-aware culture that maintains consciousness of our place in the environment. “Going green” and embracing organic is front and center, here expressed through handicraft hairdressing techniques.

Georganic is organized around a series of diametrically cut shapes executed with L-shaped layering and reverse graduation techniques. The result: a design paradox, illustrated with oppositional effects.

The most evident design element, color, “is all about contrast, softness and shimmer,” says Lucas Etticity, Sassoon Academy creative director.

The final looks arise out of the artist’s engagement with hair on an organic level. “The Geoganic collection is a return to craftsmanship in hair,” declares Hayes.

This is a true Sassoon look and precision cut that draws on our model’s natural texture,”  says Armand deLeon, creative director at the Beverly Hills Sassoon salon, “and transforms it into a couture headpiece.

 

 

“I like the emphasis on the pure and clean looks in this collection,” says Traci Sakosits, Sassoon Academy creative director. “On Erin, we created a modern organic look using her features as an inspiration and a guide.”

 

“To get the pastel tones you must start with a light color and add one-inch color increments,” explains Lucas Etticity. “Although it is quite technical and time-consuming, it is definitely worth it when you see the end result.”


Cut and style by Mark Hayes, Traci Sakosits and Armand deLeon; color by Lucas Etticity; photography by Steven Barston, www.stevenbarston.com; make-up by Melissa Klein and Noel Nichols. Wardrobe courtesy of Sassoon Academy.

 

 

 

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