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3 Experts Share How to Help Your Clients with Thinning Hair

by Anne Moratto | April 10, 2019
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<strong>NIOXIN/ Nioxin Top Artist Diane Stevens</strong>
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NIOXIN/ Nioxin Top Artist Diane Stevens
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<strong>BOSLEY PROFESSIONAL/</strong> Michelle Blaisure, Bosley Professional
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BOSLEY PROFESSIONAL/ Michelle Blaisure, Bosley Professional
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<strong>NIOXIN/ Nioxin Top Artist Diane Stevens</strong>
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NIOXIN/ Nioxin Top Artist Diane Stevens
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<strong>BOSLEY PROFESSIONAL/</strong> Michelle Blaisure, Bosley Professional
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BOSLEY PROFESSIONAL/ Michelle Blaisure, Bosley Professional
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These three experts get to the root of what can cause thinning hair and how a correct consultation and real facts will lead to the best outcome.

 GrandeHAIR/ Dr. Joshua Zeichner director of Cosmetic and Clinical Research in Dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY.

 MS:  How do consultations differ when working with clients of different markets? For instance, how would you address thinning hair when working with an aging client, vs post- partum/menopausal, men vs women, etc.

 Dr. Joshua Zeichner: Hair thinning may have a different cause depending on your age, general state of health, or gender.  However, the approach to evaluating thinning hair is exactly the same for all patients. It is important to examine the scalp for the pattern of hair thinning, look for any signs of infection or inflammation, and determine whether there is any permanent scarring. You have to take a thorough medical history including all medications patient is taking, including any that are new. In addition any recent changes in physical or emotional well-being need to be discussed. After taking a thorough history and performing a physical exam, blood work may be taken in some patients to evaluate for underlying medical conditions associated with certain types of hair thinning.

 MS:  Knowing that there is a cost involved, but also knowing results are best when used as a collection and when used consistently, how can you work with your clients to get them to commit to a hair maintenance system? What’s the best approach?

  JZ: Once you determine the cause of the thinning hair, you can discuss with your patient a specific regimen to adhere to. This regimen may include supplements, topical hair treatments, and specific shampoos and conditioners. It is important to educate patients that the wrong hair products can make thinning hair worse. If you’re looking for an over-the-counter regimen, I like GrandeHAIR Peptide Shampoo and Conditioner because it supports hair follicle health and can help to naturally thicken existing hair.  

 MS:  Women are appearing in a lot of more hair thinning/marketing, making it more comfortable to address than ever before. But there are still big myths out there in the category. What is the biggest myth that clients have related to their hair loss/thinning, and how can stylists be proactive about addressing those concerns?

 JZ: Thinning hair is a common problem, and it is nothing to be ashamed about. The earlier you address hair thinning, the better your potential outcome. So if you feel that your hair is thinning, it is important to visit a board-certified dermatologist for evaluation. It is a myth that over washing your hair can cause thinning hair. It is also a myth that thinning hair comes from your maternal grandfather.

  NIOXIN/ Nioxin Top Artist Diane Stevens

 MS:  How do consultations differ when working with clients of different markets? For instance, how would you address thinning hair when working with an aging client versus post-partum/menopausal, men vs women, etc.?

 Diane Stevens: Hair analysis is an important element of the client consultation.  It helps the stylist determine what a client loves about their hair and also determine any weaknesses/challenges which are usually shedding, breakage and their hair used to be thicker and fuller.

 My salon uses the same consultation but often customizes according to some situations, i.e. men vs women in some areas of styling with hot tools, post-partum guests with additional shedding due to hormones and low maintenance hairstyling due to multitasking, and aging guests with concerns with a receding hairline, male-pattern or female-pattern baldness. 

 MS: Knowing that there is a cost involved, but also knowing results are best when used as a collection and when used consistently, how can you work with your clients to get them to commit to a hair maintenance system? What’s the best approach? Please have your answer be non-brand specific, more consultative.

DS: The new trend is treatments for making hair look and feel amazing!  As a stylist, I am truly a fan of brands that have a complete system with proven results. Instant gratification is important. I want my client to instantly see how the shampoo, conditioner, treatment, styling product worked to make their hair feel amazing.  Then the client is even more loyal and they will share the great results of the system I recommended.

 MS: Women are appearing in a lot more hair thinning/marketing, making it more comfortable to address than ever before. But there are still big myths out there in the category. What is the biggest myth that clients have related to their hair loss/thinning, and how can stylists be proactive about addressing those concerns?

DS: I think one of the biggest myths about hair thinning is that it mainly affects women with thin or fine hair. False!

I’ve seen clients with coarse hair and medium textured hair, curly hair, highly textured hair also experience hair loss and thinning.  Genetics, medical conditions, and even stress can contribute to hair loss and thinning.  It’s not only clients with super fine hair.

 BOSLEY PROFESSIONAL/ Michelle Blaisure, Bosley Professional

 MS:   How do consultations differ when working with clients of different markets? For instance, how would you address thinning hair when working with an aging client, vs post- partum/menopausal, men vs women, etc.  

 Michelle Blaisure: The key to doing any consultation regardless of age, gender or ethnicity, is to first gather as much historical and biological information as possible.  It’s important you know at what age or stage their life that they started to show thinning.  Does hair loss or thinning run in the family?  As probative questions about your client’s lifestyle that may be involved in causing or contributing to the hair loss.  Discuss your client’s diet, medications, stress level, quality and quantity of sleep and general grooming practices.  If your client has recently given birth, that can have a huge effect on the density of the hair.  

 While genetics is a primary driver for men experiencing hair loss (and about 20 % of women), aging is a secondary factor especially for women. In fact studies show women’s hair density and diameter begins changing in our mid 30’s which is about the time perimenopause starts. By the time a women reaches age 50 many will lose as much as 50% of their hair density.

 With post-partum, excessive hair shedding is not uncommon. During pregnancy, normal hair shedding declines due to the high levels of circulating hormones. After giving birth, as hormones levels start going back to their normal range, all that extra hair begins to shed. This usually occurs about three to four months after birth then after a while it will self-correct and go back to the normal range of 80 to100 hairs daily.

 MS: Knowing that there is a cost involved, but also knowing results are best when used as a collection and when used consistently, how can you work with your clients to get them to commit to a hair maintenance system? What’s the best approach? Please have your answer be non-brand specific, more consultative.

 MB: The key is educating a client on why maintenance is important in keeping their hair and what can happen if they do nothing. Hair is very dynamic and changes with age, diet and lifestyle. Just like you brush your teeth daily, using products and supplements daily to keep your scalp and hair healthy and products designed for thinning hair will help support healthy hair growth. Many people need to add in a supplement as deficiencies in Vitamin D, B 12, minerals like Zinc and Iron and Omega 3 fatty acids which is very important for your immune system, are common and can contribute to hair loss. It’s easier to keep your hair then to get it back once you have lost it. Work with them on what they are willing to commit to long term and on what is their budget. Products that can help can cost as little as a $1.50 a day depending on severity, which is less than a cup of coffee!

 MS: Women are appearing in a lot of more hair thinning/marketing, making it more comfortable to address than ever before. But there are still big myths out there in the category. What is the biggest myth that clients have related to their hair loss/thinning, and how can stylists be proactive about addressing those concerns?

  MB: I think the biggest myth is that if I do not shampoo it will not fall out!  Stylist are trained on hair biology and explaining that once hair is in the resting cycle it is going to shed and that products and supplements help to keep more hair actively growing and less hair staying in the resting cycle. Secondly, I think it is important to explain the importance of cleansing the scalp as bacteria and pollution can affect the scalp and lead to inflammation and scalp problems. 

 Another myth is dry shampoo will clean as well as shampooing.  We are seeing more hair loss due to the excessive use of dry shampoos, going too long between shampooing and this is impacting the scalp and leading to hair loss. Dry shampoo is great to help remove oil and debris but is not a substitute for shampooing. Stylists need to educate themselves and be willing to ask questions to be able to help their clients have the best hair they can produce as the stylist is the first line of defense. It starts with a healthy scalp, a healthy diet and when needed, internal support. 

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