Close

Style

Grooming Revolution: How Men's Styling Has Evolved

by Jamie Newman | May 22, 2019
American Crew’s Global Artistic Director, Paul Wilson, celebrates the brand’s milestone birthday by reflecting on the past, present and future of men’s grooming. Jamie Newman
American Crew’s Global Artistic Director, Paul Wilson, celebrates the brand’s milestone birthday by reflecting on the past, present and future of men’s grooming.Jamie Newman

Male clientele have had a growingly keen eye for how they want their hair to look. Because of that, they’re more willing to experiment with their cuts, invest in products and services and become regulars in your chair. It doesn’t sound hyperbolic to be certain that the men’s grooming boom is here to stay—but, it hasn’t always been that way. Paul Wilson, American Crew Global Artistic Director, talks men’s grooming history, trends and the everlasting importance of education.

As American Crew celebrates its 25th birthday, how has men’s grooming changed in the past 25 years?
When American Crew started, there was nothing happening for men’s hair. I wasn’t taught how to cut men’s hair. Maybe we were taught how to put a guard attachment on a clipper, but there was really no conversation about it beyond that. Now, there’s a whole philosophy and a whole language for dealing with men in the salon. In some way, I feel like Crew deserves a vast majority of the credit in so much of that because Crew started that. By bringing such education and attention to the craft and to the art form of cutting men’s hair, it spawned the whole barber movement—that’s been the most amazing thing to see. 

What trends are you seeing in men’s grooming?
The direction of men’s hair is really broadening. Now, we’re going to start seeing some really cool silhouettes come into it, some length, which is going to require all of us to delve into our abilities and tools—we’re going to be using the razor more, we’re really going to be working with secondary shape and making the haircut come to life with that detail work.

What is the best way to create shape in a men’s cut?
When using a clipper specifically, we work in vertical panels. It’s best to start on the side and get your first design panel set in for your own purpose in knowing what to do for the silhouette of the shape and how graduated or not graduated it’s going to be, how much scalp exposure you’re going to have, and to ensure you and your client are on the same page. So if you can get that first design panel really locked in, you can have that conversation with your client and then really fly through the rest of that shape. 

What is the difference between clipper-over-comb and using a guard and fading out the shape?
With clipper-over-comb, you can work in vertical panels to rough in the shape. Then, you can go in with your clipper and build in the freehand work, which will create the more extreme elements of the taper, like scalp exposure, and really detailing the taper itself. The difference is the ability to be creative.

As male clientele’s demand for longer cuts and styles increases, how can salon professionals hone in on the trend to find the both success with their skills and business?
Education is really important. Education has really been the lifeblood of the brand [American Crew]. With this trend, it’s really important to be able to have conversations with your male clientele about how their hair will grow out, what the shape will look like, how he is going to style it. All men’s education is flowing out of the American Crew academy in Chicago; the schedule can be found at americancrew.com.

 

How to Keep Curls Hydrated and Full of Shine

Style

How to Keep Curls Hydrated and Full of Shine

by Mary Kaleta

Nadria Brown is a Florida-based curl specialist who educates both her clients and fellow stylists on tips and tricks for maintaining and ehancing their natural texture. Brown reaches for products from DevaCurl to help her achieve the results her clients desire.

Find out why over 400,000 subscribers love our newsletters

Videos

In our video section, watch salon professionals in action, listen to the advice of salon business experts, and tour inside the world’s top salons.

Valsamis used GL Tapes from Great Lengths to give this braid depth and thickness.

Style

Add Extensions to Give Braids Dimension

by Mary Kaleta

When looking to add fullness and volume to her braided styles, artist Alison Valsamis (@braidedandblonde) uses extensions. In this video tutorial, Valsamis incorporated Great Lengths' GL Tapes to give this 3D pull-through braid extra depth.

Updo How-To: Romantic Bridal Bun

Style

Updo How-To: Romantic Bridal Bun

by Mary Kaleta

Smooth, sleek finishes are a signature staple for Ohio-based stylist Caralee Pridemore. The bridal specialist is able to create intricate and detailed updos that still have an air of elegance and uniformity. Pridemore knows the perfect updo starts with the right foundation. She told MODERN that her recent tool must-have when creating her looks is the new Olivia Garden Ceramic + Ion Professional Flat Iron.

Updo How-To: Low, Textured Bun

Style

Updo How-To: Low, Textured Bun

by Mary Kaleta

Artist Connective member Caralee Pridemore is known for her classic and timeless updos. Here, Pridemore shares with MODERN how to recreate a stunning low textured bun in an easy-to-follow video tutorial.

Floyd's 99 Joins the Fight Against Diabetes

News

Floyd's 99 Joins the Fight Against Diabetes

by Staff

Floyd's 99, the hair-cutting and shave shop, rolls out its annual partnership with the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF), the leading global organization dedicated to funding type 1 diabetes (T1D) research.

Load More